Synthetic stock free float

If you are going to free float the barrel and glass bed the action I would recommend getting a new stock. Most gunsmiths won't work on a factory synthetic stock. For an inexpensive option check out boyd's laminate stocks, I like the prairie hunter model. If you want something made out of fiberglass, etc look at the bell & carlson medalist. When replacing the trigger, I noticed that the barrel rested on two synthetic rails molded to the front end of the stock. Since the stock is synthetic and the effect of humidity is minimal, should I worry about floating the barrel? All my other rifles with synthetic stocks are free floated (Steyr, Tikka and Remington).

You want to free float the barrel, but you need to extend the bedding material out in front of the recoil lug about ¾ of an inch, rather than have the barrel completely free floating like you would when using the spot bedding technique. or rifles that generate quite a bit of recoil that use a synthetic stock with compartments in the forend. Do you need to free float the barrel on a synthetic stock? I know wood stocks need the free floating due to changing humidity causing the stock to touch the barrel and affect accuracy. Does this hold true for synthetic stocks? The reason I am asking is my new synthetic stock seems to touch the barrel alot. P.S. Ruger American Rifle - DIY Upgrade - Free Float Barrel lightweight synthetic stock designed for quick, easy handling blends a classic look with modern forend contouring and grip serrations Randy Boyd demonstrates "Why" and "How to" free float your rifle barrel channel. This is when you have clearance between the barrel of your firearm and the stock. This clearance is meant to Nero, Just curious, but why would a stock need to be stiff to allow you to free float a barrel? I'm not gunsmith and I have no experience with the Rem synthetics, but it seems to me that you could free float a barrel on anything that was stiff enough to keep its own self from touching the barrel when in use.

Re: Free Floating Factory Synthetic Stock « Reply #9 on: November 02, 2018, 04:19:22 AM » I thought I needed/wanted to bed and free float the bbl on my superlite because of sporadic groups with a bullet I really hoped it would shoot.

27 Jun 2016 Laminated and synthetic stocks are not weather sensitive, so they are better for this purpose. If you just can't part with your wooden stock (hey,  First off -is the stock you want designed to free float the barrel out of the box? Bell & Carlson Weatherby's are not, they all have the forend pads as per Ed  29 Aug 2017 This method is not used because free floating has proven superior in all cases, but rather, How-To: Block Bedding Synthetic-Stock Rifles. Along with bedding, the barrel should always be free floated (not touching the stock forend). Nevertheless, regardless of efforts to free float the barrel, plastic rifle  The barrel of a free-floating installation is (or should be) held rigidly within metal and disadvantages of having a rifle with a wood stock over a synthetic stock? I tried to free-float the stock on my VTR with a dremel, and the stock must have been internally warped. Cause the entire left side of the stock contacted the barrel (so much for free floating). Reinforcing the forend, as suggested earlier in this post would be a good idea. Remington's plastic stock are a ***. Re: Free Floating Factory Synthetic Stock « Reply #9 on: November 02, 2018, 04:19:22 AM » I thought I needed/wanted to bed and free float the bbl on my superlite because of sporadic groups with a bullet I really hoped it would shoot.

Re: Free Floating Factory Synthetic Stock « Reply #9 on: November 02, 2018, 04:19:22 AM » I thought I needed/wanted to bed and free float the bbl on my superlite because of sporadic groups with a bullet I really hoped it would shoot.

toll free: 877.365.6148 AS YOU READ THIS, SOMEWHERE AROUND THE WORLD SOMEONE IS PUTTING OUR STOCK’S REPUTATION FOR EXCELLENCE TO THE TEST. Every McMillan stock features precision accuracy built with the toughness of a tank. Re: Free Floating Factory Synthetic Stock « Reply #9 on: November 02, 2018, 04:19:22 AM » I thought I needed/wanted to bed and free float the bbl on my superlite because of sporadic groups with a bullet I really hoped it would shoot. I read to free float a synthetic stock to just take a dremel to it and sand 09-25-2011, 10:37 PM. I have a Remington 700 SPS and is not free floated. I read to free float a synthetic stock to just take a dremel to it and sand the high spots down. Does that work? if not, what would you suggest?

When replacing the trigger, I noticed that the barrel rested on two synthetic rails molded to the front end of the stock. Since the stock is synthetic and the effect of humidity is minimal, should I worry about floating the barrel? All my other rifles with synthetic stocks are free floated (Steyr, Tikka and Remington).

Randy Boyd demonstrates "Why" and "How to" free float your rifle barrel channel. This is when you have clearance between the barrel of your firearm and the stock. This clearance is meant to

First off -is the stock you want designed to free float the barrel out of the box? Bell & Carlson Weatherby's are not, they all have the forend pads as per Ed 

When replacing the trigger, I noticed that the barrel rested on two synthetic rails molded to the front end of the stock. Since the stock is synthetic and the effect of humidity is minimal, should I worry about floating the barrel? All my other rifles with synthetic stocks are free floated (Steyr, Tikka and Remington).

I tried to free-float the stock on my VTR with a dremel, and the stock must have been internally warped. Cause the entire left side of the stock contacted the barrel (so much for free floating). Reinforcing the forend, as suggested earlier in this post would be a good idea. Remington's plastic stock are a ***. Re: Free Floating Factory Synthetic Stock « Reply #9 on: November 02, 2018, 04:19:22 AM » I thought I needed/wanted to bed and free float the bbl on my superlite because of sporadic groups with a bullet I really hoped it would shoot. In some cases, your stock may be too flexible, bending too much, which would cause it to touch the barrel even if it’s free floated. In that case, I heartily recommend changing the stock. The less ideal alternative is to free float the forend all the way down, and then place a point of pressure between the barrel and the end of the forend. You want to free float the barrel, but you need to extend the bedding material out in front of the recoil lug about ¾ of an inch, rather than have the barrel completely free floating like you would when using the spot bedding technique. or rifles that generate quite a bit of recoil that use a synthetic stock with compartments in the forend. Do you need to free float the barrel on a synthetic stock? I know wood stocks need the free floating due to changing humidity causing the stock to touch the barrel and affect accuracy. Does this hold true for synthetic stocks? The reason I am asking is my new synthetic stock seems to touch the barrel alot. P.S. Ruger American Rifle - DIY Upgrade - Free Float Barrel lightweight synthetic stock designed for quick, easy handling blends a classic look with modern forend contouring and grip serrations Randy Boyd demonstrates "Why" and "How to" free float your rifle barrel channel. This is when you have clearance between the barrel of your firearm and the stock. This clearance is meant to